Arshi Noor | Legistify

Arshi Noor
Answered on 31 Mar 2020

In a landmark judgment, the Supreme Court has said that crime committed by a juvenile can't be a ground to deny him a government job. The bench passed the order while rejecting the centre's stand that such persons cannot be given government jobs because of their criminal past.Read More

Posted on 30 Mar 2020 | 1 Answer

Shagun Srivastava | Legistify

Shagun Srivastava
Answered on 31 Mar 2020

Our birth certificates are one of the most important certified documents we’ll ever obtain. Not only does it prove our age, but it proves our identity, citizenship, and location of birth. We need our birth certificates to get numerous different legal documents including passports, but it’s also used as a form of ID when being hired for a new job, enrolled in school, or signed up for any military division. It’s not uncommon that when you first view your birth certificate, whether the original or a certified copy, you’ll find that there is an error or other kind of mistake. In these cases, it’s imperative that you are able to change or modify your birth certificate to reflect all of the pertinent details that identify who you are. Some reasons you may need to change or modify your birth certificate include changing your birth certificate age or changing the birth certificate date. These are mistakes that can happen to anyone, and are relatively easy to rectify. Simply contacting the vital records department that was responsible for issuing the original certificate will get you the information you need to proceed. When it comes to changing a birth certificate after a name change or after adoption, the process is a little more involved. If the individual is under 1 year of age, you may be able to submit paperwork allowing you to change your child’s name without a court order. Each state’s regulations will vary. If you’re over 1 year of age and your name change is not due to marriage, you may be required to have a court order to successfully change your name. This just means you’ll be required to prove who you are, and in most cases you’ll have to include why you’ve decided to rename yourself. If you’ve been married and you’re concerned about a change of birth certificate after marriage, you don’t need to be as concerned. A name change due to marriage doesn’t require a legal name change on your birth certificate. If you are required to get a court order to legally change or modify your birth certificate you’ll need to follow these steps: Contact the office of the court that handles name changes local to you. Fill out and submit a petition for a change of name with the correct office. On your court date, appear in front of the judge and let them know why you wish to change your name. The judge may approve or deny your request. If your request is approved you’ll receive a certified order stating you are allowed to use the name you petitioned for. Contact the vital records office responsible for issuing your original birth certificate. Inquire as to what documentation they need to issue you a new birth certificate with your new legal name. This documentation may be an application and fees may be associated. When you mail in your application, you’ll want to include a certified copy of your old birth certificate, a certified copy of your name change order, and any associated fees you are required to pay.Read More

Posted on 26 Feb 2020 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 31 Mar 2020

No, you need to approach the lower court i.e. the district civil court first. However, the High Court can be directly approached when the case matches the pecuniary jurisdiction of the court.Read More

Posted on 16 Feb 2020 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 31 Mar 2020

Yes, it is a safe option, but carefully evaluate the loan document before signing it.Read More

Posted on 11 Feb 2020 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 31 Mar 2020

Each case has its own unique process. Thus, mentioning a time in a consumer complaint would not be possible.Read More

Posted on 10 Feb 2020 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 31 Mar 2020

You can consult a good employment lawyer in India for such matter as the lawyer needs to understand all details before coming to a conclusion.Read More

Posted on 17 Jan 2020 | 1 Answer

Arshi Noor | Legistify

Arshi Noor
Answered on 30 Mar 2020

If you live in Mumbai, Kolkata or Chennai, you will be governed by the Presidency Towns Insolvency Act, 1909; for all other places in India, you will be governed by the Provincial Insolvency Act, 1920. Both laws are similar and eventually are meant to be replaced by the IBC. Under the Provincial Insolvency Act, you can file for bankruptcy if you are unable to repay a debt greater than INR 500.Read More

Posted on 21 Mar 2020 | 2 Answers

Tanya Mahajan | Legistify

Tanya Mahajan
Answered on 30 Mar 2020

Usually, this results in the car/two wheeler company asking dealers to waive off handling charges. Many buyers are unaware that handling charges are illegal, and end up paying large amounts of money as handling charges. In case of luxury cars, these charges can go up to Rs. 50,000, or even more.Read More

Posted on 23 Mar 2020 | 1 Answer

Aditya Dua | Legistify

Aditya Dua
Answered on 28 Mar 2020

The limitation period for filing an application for setting aside an ex parte decree is 30 days from the date of knowledge of the decree. You need to file within this period itself.Read More

Posted on 24 Mar 2020 | 1 Answer

Sakshi Yadav | Legistify

Sakshi Yadav
Answered on 28 Mar 2020

If there a rule which is already stating max fees to be taken by College is 1.25 then what ground you wanted to go to Court. A discretion has given to college it's a management call.Read More

Posted on 24 Mar 2020 | 1 Answer