Riya Chopra | Legistify

Riya Chopra
Answered on 22 Nov 2019

You need to first lodge a complaint with your city's cyber crime division or write a letter to the DCP. The FIR that you have already lodged should also be supplied to them. They can help trace the IP address from where the IPIN was used. As far as your credit card bill is concerned, you can try to personally convince the bank officials by showing them the FIR.Read More

Posted on 15 Nov 2019 | 2 Answers

Sakshi Yadav | Legistify

Sakshi Yadav
Answered on 23 Nov 2019

If there is any proof to prove that the company is fraud, then you can defend yourself. If not, then is there any agreement that you have signed with the company where it is mentioned, you have to give some amount to them.  Consult a fraud matters lawyer to send a legal notice to the company.Read More

Posted on 11 Nov 2019 | 2 Answers

Shagun Srivastava | Legistify

Shagun Srivastava
Answered on 02 Dec 2019

I would advise you to approach a lawyer you can trust, who will be sensitive and supportive. Through such a person, file a civil case asking for an injunction from the court on the individuals who are threatening you. Once notice is served on them, they will be worried and not want to make things worse by leaking anything unless they are lunatics. If you think they are insane, then go to the police straight instead of following this approach. Otherwise, this is the best bet.Read More

Posted on 13 Nov 2019 | 1 Answer

Tanya Mahajan | Legistify

Tanya Mahajan
Answered on 29 Nov 2019

You can file an FIR in the local police station and start criminal proceedings against the blackmailer. Blackmailing amounts to Criminal intimidation, which is well defined in the Indian Penal Code section 503 as- Whoever threatens another with any injury to his person, reputation or property, or to the person or reputation of anyone in whom that person is interested, with intent to cause alarm to that person, or to cause that person to do any act which he is not legally bound to do, or to omit to do any act which that person is legally entitled to do, as the means of avoiding the execution of such threat, commits criminal intimidation. The offence of criminal intimidation can be punished with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to two years, or with fine, or with both.Read More

Posted on 27 Nov 2019 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 10 Dec 2019

You need to file a cyber complaint against the person. Hire a cyber law advocate to go with you to the cyber cell to pressurise the police into working on your matter.Read More

Posted on 08 Aug 2019 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 10 Dec 2019

You can block the person's number to avoid such fake calls. If the person threatens you with legal action, you can consult a lawyer to send them a legal notice.Read More

Posted on 21 Aug 2019 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 10 Dec 2019

If the notice is received from Instagram, explain that you have not posted anything absurd. If it is from some random person, you can ignore it, unless it is something unlawful.Read More

Posted on 21 Aug 2019 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 18 Nov 2019

This is a cyber crime of phishing. The person can file a cyber crime complaint by visiting the cyber cell of the nearest police station.Read More

Posted on 03 Sep 2019 | 1 Answer

Shagun Srivastava | Legistify

Shagun Srivastava
Answered on 15 Nov 2019

Section 451 of CrPC lays down the provision for Disposal Of Property. It says that once the property is taken by the police of which the user is done its the police obligation is to give back the commodity and if they fail to do so then you can file a complaint against them. You can get your laptop back if the case has been dismissed or you have been acquitted. However, if the case is still going on, then the laptop is evidence.Read More

Posted on 14 Nov 2019 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 05 Nov 2019

The procedure for reporting cybercrimes is more or less the same as for reporting any other kind of offence. The local police stations can be approached for filing complaints just as the cybercrime cells specially designated with the jurisdiction to register a complaint. In addition, provisions have now been made for the filing of 'E-FIR' in most of the states. In addition, the Ministry of Home Affairs is also launching a website for registering crimes against women and children online including cybercrimes. If a police station refuses to register the complaint, a representation may be given to the commissioner of police/superintendent of police. If in spite of that action is not taken, the next step could either be a private complaint before the concerned court or a writ before the high court. In general, there is still a lot of inertia in the registration and investigation of cybercrimes. This does affect the collation of electronic evidence and containment of damages, whether the offence is against an individual or business.Read More

Posted on 08 Sep 2019 | 1 Answer