Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 11 Feb 2019

To get copyright registration for an artistic work relating to a public figure, a No Objection Certificate is required. You can hire an IPR lawyer in India to get an NOC from the PMO as the procedure can be a little tricky.  Under the Copyright Act, 1957, the following work can be copyrighted. Imaginative work including a canvas, a figure, a drawing (counting an outline, guide, graph or plan), an etching, a photo, a work of engineering or masterful craftsmanship, emotional work Scholarly work (counting PC programs, tables, arrangements and PC databases) Musical work (counting music and additionally graphical documentation) Sound recording Cinematograph film A Copyright registration application is filed along with copies of the work, after which a diary number is issued to the applicant. The Copyright registration application is kept open for the public to raise any objections for a period of 30 days. If no objection is received against the application, the Copyright Registrar registers the work. If any objections are raised, a reply can be sent to the Registrar. The Registrar can grant the Copyright or reject the application on the basis of reply to Copyright objection.Read More

Posted on 11 Feb 2019 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 28 Sep 2018

If you have registered your work as a copyright protected work, then you can issue legal notice and file a case for copying your work as the act of copying someone's work is infringement of copyright. In case you have not applied for copyright for your work yet, to protect your content further, you may file for a copyright application and safeguard against further misuse. Read More

Posted on 10 Mar 2016 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 28 Sep 2018

Yes, If you want protection in advance you can apply for copyright. Read More

Posted on 10 Mar 2016 | 2 Answers

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 28 Sep 2018

Any person claiming to be the owner of the work to be copyrighted can apply for copyright registration. The person can be an individual, company, NGO, etc.Read More

Posted on 04 Mar 2016 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 28 Sep 2018

Copyright can be enforced for commercial used of non propitiatory property. But as you claimed, you used the s/w for learning purpose only, then it is exempted from copyright or any other IPR LAW. you need not worry, if you have used it for knowledge, research or learning purpose. You write a letter to the concern authority of the Autodesk and let them know that, what was your purpose behind using the previous version and now you do not require it. Even if they did not act or reacted to your letter/email and forced to to buy the licensed copy then you can use this letter/email as an evidence to show your bonafideness in Court. Read More

Posted on 16 Apr 2016 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 28 Sep 2018

This depends on what type of work you are writing or putting on your company website, how you are using the borrowed material, and the expectations of your instructor. First, you have to think about how you want to identify your sources. If your sources are very important to your ideas, you should mention the author and work in a sentence that introduces your citation. If, however, you are only citing the source to make a minor point, you may consider using parenthetical references, footnotes, or endnotes. Everything Printed or Published is Copyrighted Everything printed, published, recorded, or “fixed” in a permanent form is copyrighted. That’s the international law and standards, simplified. This applies to words, photographs, graphics, images, audio, and other visual media. This doesn’t mean that you can’t copy and use the content. It does mean you can use it under certain restrictions and guidelines. Here are some tips for dealing with potential copyright protected content when converting from a newsletter to a blog. Free-to-Use: Free-to-Use typically means that while you are free to use this however you want, it may not mean you can just do whatever you want with the content. There may or may not be conditions on that use such as private and personal use, not commercial, not on sites with ads, not for resale, and must include link credit back to the source. Check the copyright policy or ask to determine what conditions they have on “free-to-use”. Buy-to-Use: Content, including photographs, can be purchased for use, but what are the conditions of that purchase and use? Does it mean one time only in a specific usage? Or repeated usage in any way, shape, or form for as long as you both shall live? Find out the fine print before you buy so you use it properly, as a purchase agreement can be interpreted as a contract. Which Usage Permitted? How is the content meant to be used? Is it only for print, within newsletters, or can it be published on the web as well? Some content may have restrictions on how and where you can use it. Just because you got permission to use it in a newsletter does not mean the content has permission to be published on the web. If You Can’t Use It, Can You Link to It? If you cannot use the full content, you do have other options if you want to still point readers and members to the source. Under Copyright Fair Use guides, you may “quote” from a small portion of the content with a link citing the original source. This is commonly called “block quoting”. Or, you can describe the content and include a link to direct readers to the source. Copy-cat Plagiarism: On the web, as in real life, copy-cats, copiers, and plagiarist are not welcome. Plagiarists caught after the fact tend to reflect poorly on the entire parent organization, not just on the plagiarist. Don’t risk it. Yes, it meant that all those cute cartoons, comics, graphics of working women, children, cats, and dogs, all had to be checked to see if they could be used on the web. Tedious, but if they wanted to use them, they had to check. Otherwise, they could not be used on their new blog. Getting Permission to Publish Content on the Web For this particular association, the non-original content on their newsletter came from a wide variety of resources. Flyers and brochures found at conferences, conventions, classes, and business training offices, online sources, books of all ages, and from other newsletter sources. Online content can be easy to search for to find their copyright policy. It may say yes. Printed material, however, may involve looking for a policy statement in their copyright notice, or calling or email them for permission. The same applies to schools and training offices which provide educational material. One such pamphlet the newsletter editor typed up and posted in their newsletter came from a training office. “They were handing them out free, so why can’t I publish this?” Just because you picked it up for free doesn’t mean you have the right to publish the material. You have to have permission. If you cannot get permission, then you have these options: 1. Don’t publish it. 2. Use a small quote or reference and give them credit. Do not use the whole thing. 3. Rewrite the whole thing in your words, citing them as your “inspiration” and source of material. Don’t just change the words. Write it as if it was new from the start. Read More

Posted on 31 May 2017 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 28 Sep 2018

The IPRs covered by the TRIPS Agreement are:Copyright and related rights (i.e. the rights of performers, producers of sound recordings and broadcasting organizations)Trademarks, including service marks,Geographical indications including appellations of origin,Industrial designs,Patents including the protection of new varieties of plants,Layout-designs (topographies) of integrated circuits,Undisclosed information, including trade secrets and test data. Read More

Posted on 01 Jun 2016 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 28 Sep 2018

You have 2 options available to you: 1. Remove the content from your website and settle the matter. 2. Send a reply in the form of a legal notice stating the content which is being claimed to be infringing their copyright is of common knowledge and general in nature and that the same does not amount to a copyright infringement. Thereafter, they shall have the option of filing a complaint in the Court as copyright infringement is a criminal offence and if the same is proven then the minimum punishment is 6 months imprisonment or a fine of Rs 50,000/-. You shall have the right to defend yourself and prove that the content does not amount to copyright and therefore, cannot be claimed to be a copyright of the School. You can also show that you are the prior user of this name. Read More

Posted on 10 Mar 2016 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 28 Sep 2018

The issue in hand involves using the content of other websites without violating the Copyright laws. In this case, in order to legally use the required content from other websites, it is imperative to ask for permission from the owner and then save a copy of that permission where you can easily access it, in case there are any queries about it later. Moreover, Fair use of the required content, which is mentioned under Section 107 of the Copyright Act, should be upheld. Section 107 provide four factors for fair use which are: The purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for non-profit educational purposes. The nature of the copyrighted work. The amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole. The effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work. Read More

Posted on 01 Nov 2017 | 1 Answer

Team Legistify | Legistify

Team Legistify
Answered on 28 Sep 2018

Copyright can be enforced for commercial use of non propitiatory property. But as you claimed, you used the s/w for learning purpose only, then it is exempted from copyright or any other IPR LAW. You need not worry, if you have used it for knowledge, research or learning purpose, You write a letter to the concern authority of the Autodesk and let them know what was your purpose behind using the previous version and now you do not require it. Even if they did not act or reacted to your letter/email and forced to to buy the licensed copy then you can use this letter/email as an evidence to show your bonafideness in Court. Read More

Posted on 10 Mar 2016 | 1 Answer