Advocate Kishan (Retd. Judge) | Legistify

Advocate Kishan (Retd. Judge)
Answered on 29 Jan 2020

You can implead yourself as the legal heir of your deceased father in the capacity of plaintiff only.Read More

Posted on 27 Jan 2020 | 2 Answers

Sakshi Yadav | Legistify

Sakshi Yadav
Answered on 29 Jan 2020

You have to take a license for the same from Municipality department. there will be penalty as well you have to pay as have constructed without legal permission.Read More

Posted on 26 Jan 2020 | 1 Answer

Advocate Kishan (Retd. Judge) | Legistify

Advocate Kishan (Retd. Judge)
Answered on 29 Jan 2020

You may file divorce with alimony and also can file Domestic Violence Case and seek monthly maintenance.Read More

Posted on 27 Jan 2020 | 2 Answers

Aayushi Sang | Legistify

Aayushi Sang
Answered on 29 Jan 2020

There is a lot that has to go on when you decide to buy a property or land than a normal business deal where you get a plot of land in exchange for money. Before going into the details of plot registration, there are a few terms you must know Registration fee – It is a small percentage of the total cost of the plot paid by the buyer to the state government for registering the property on his name. Stamp Duty – It is a small percentage of the total plot cost imposed on the buyer during submission or recognition of the required documents. It is paid to claim that the submitted documents are valid Property Guideline value – It is the minimum cost of your land estimated by the state government. Stamp duty in Bangalore, in both urban and rural settlements, is 5.6% of the saleable value of the plot. The registration fee is, however, 1% of the saleable value. The saleable value of a property, in simple ways, is the product of the property size and the guideline value. In some states, women and senior citizens get a discount on both registration fee and stamp duty charges.Read More

Posted on 26 Jan 2020 | 1 Answer

Sakshi Yadav | Legistify

Sakshi Yadav
Answered on 29 Jan 2020

If he raised a dispute regarding the sale of the property then you cannot do so. You need a no-objection certificate for the sale of the property. Or you can opt for Gist deed.Read More

Posted on 26 Jan 2020 | 1 Answer

Advocate Kishan (Retd. Judge) | Legistify

Advocate Kishan (Retd. Judge)
Answered on 29 Jan 2020

It depends on several factors. Simple collusion may not give you any compensation unless your car sustained damages or you got severe injuries.Read More

Posted on 27 Jan 2020 | 1 Answer

Tanya Mahajan | Legistify

Tanya Mahajan
Answered on 28 Jan 2020

The co-owner can sell or transfer his portion only when he has exclusive rights to that portion of the property. If the exclusive rights are not entitled to each co-owner, such transfer of rights cannot take place without the consent of other joint co-owners. The Court fee to be charged for partition is a state subject and varies from state to state and Such Court fees depend on the market value of the property. You are the owner of your own share and if you want to sell it, it's your wish.Read More

Posted on 27 Jan 2020 | 2 Answers

Aayushi Sang | Legistify

Aayushi Sang
Answered on 28 Jan 2020

A cheque bounce is among the common financial offences which can land the issuer into legal trouble and damage his or her credit rating. In India, the number of pending court cases relating to cheque bounce offences is huge. A cheque is bounced if the issuer writes a bad cheque - due to technical reasons like a mismatch of signature or overwriting, or also when there are insufficient funds in the account as a result of it is not processed by the bank. The cheque is then returned unpaid or dishonoured. Repeat offences can have serious repercussions. The offender may be slapped with a huge bounced-cheque fee or even a prison term. The bank may stop the cheque book facility or even close your account. Although the Reserve Bank of India states that such action can be taken only if cheques, valued Rs 1 crore or above, have bounced more than four times. As you have said that the person is not returning your money and the instrument in your possession has dishonoured. (Cheque- bounce). There are two remedies available to you; Firstly, you can file a criminal complaint under negotiable instruments act. (It has to be filed in the Court under whose jurisdiction the bank where the instrument was dishonoured is situated) Secondly, you can file a money suit under the provisions of the code of civil procedure. Lastly, you can initiate both the measures, the person will run back to you along with your money and request to settle the matter after receiving the summons/ warrants.Read More

Posted on 27 Jan 2020 | 2 Answers