Tanya Mahajan | Legistify

Tanya Mahajan
Answered on 13 Jan 2020

If someone has posted your personal information or uploaded a video of you without your consent, you should contact the uploader and ask them to remove the content. If they are not going so, you can file the case against that person under cyber law.Read More

Posted on 10 Jan 2020 | 1 Answer

Sakshi Yadav | Legistify

Sakshi Yadav
Answered on 10 Jan 2020

If you have the proof regarding the fraud done by them, then you can initiate legal proceeding against them. Even if you don't have any proof you need a lawyer to send a reply to your legal notice.Read More

Posted on 09 Jan 2020 | 2 Answers

None | Legistify

None
Answered on 06 Jan 2020

If you want to prove that you have been victimised, you immediately need to file a complaint with your nearest police station or cybercrime cell. Though police may just file a formal report and not pursue the matter, it is still important because it acts as proof that you have been the victim of identity theft.Read More

Posted on 24 Jul 2019 | 1 Answer

None | Legistify

None
Answered on 06 Jan 2020

The MP police can freeze your account if you performed some malicious activity through your account in MP. You need to contact your bank and talk to the cyber cell to know the reason why your account was frozen.Read More

Posted on 24 Jul 2019 | 1 Answer

None | Legistify

None
Answered on 06 Jan 2020

You can file a criminal complaint against your ex-boyfriend for blackmailing you. Blackmailing is a criminal offence under the Indian Penal Code, and he can face jail time for this.Read More

Posted on 25 Jul 2019 | 1 Answer

Aayushi Sang | Legistify

Aayushi Sang
Answered on 24 Dec 2019

Cybercrime, including trolling has no jurisdiction. Such crime can be reported to the cybercrime units of a city, irrespective of the place the offence is committed. Submit an application letter addressing the chief of the Cybercrime Division. While lodging a cyber complaint, you need to provide your name, contact details and address for mailing. The complaint has to be addressed to the head of the Cybercrime Division of the city where you are filing the cybercrime complaint.Read More

Posted on 26 Aug 2019 | 1 Answer

Aayushi Sang | Legistify

Aayushi Sang
Answered on 24 Dec 2019

Cyberstalking is the act of using the Internet to systematically and repeatedly harass, threaten or intimidate someone. This can be done through email, social media, chat rooms, instant messaging or other online mediums. Cyberstalking falls under anti-stalking, slander and harassment laws that are already in place and are punished similarly. If you are a victim of cyberstalking there are a few actions you should take: Minors should tell a parent or a trusted adult. Collect evidence of conversations where you attempt to stop the harassment. Present documents to legal authorities. Change your email and passwords to keep your information secure. Block the cyberstalker on all social media. It is NOT suggested to meet your cyberstalker in person.Read More

Posted on 09 Sep 2019 | 1 Answer

Aayushi Sang | Legistify

Aayushi Sang
Answered on 24 Dec 2019

Section 66A of the Information Technology (Amendment) Act, 2008 prohibits the sending of offensive messages though a communication device (i.e. through an online medium). The types of information this covers are offensive messages of a menacing character, or a message that the sender knows to be false but is sent for the purpose of ‘causing annoyance, inconvenience, danger, obstruction, insult, injury, criminal intimidation, enmity, hatred, or ill will.’ If you’re booked under Section 66A, you could face up to 3 years of imprisonment along with a fine.Read More

Posted on 20 Dec 2019 | 1 Answer

Karishma Pandit | Legistify

Karishma Pandit
Answered on 24 Dec 2019

Blackmailing amounts to Criminal intimidation, which is well defined in the Indian Penal Code section 503. Whoever threatens another with any injury to his person, reputation or property, or to the person or reputation of anyone in whom that person is interested, with intent to cause alarm to that person. The offence of criminal intimidation can be punished with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to two years, or with fine, or with both. It can also be described under section 384. Whoever commits extortion shall be punished with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to three years, or with fine, or with both. Under this provision, the punishment is of 3 years and this offence is a NON-BAILABLE offence and triable in any Magistrate.Read More

Posted on 20 Aug 2019 | 1 Answer

Ayaskanta Parida | Legistify

Ayaskanta Parida
Answered on 19 Dec 2019

No, it is not a violation of privacy in the present case, as there was the transmission of the documents between a bank which is regulated by the government (even though it is privately owned) and a government body for the perusal of the complaint.Read More

Posted on 01 Sep 2019 | 1 Answer